Sunday, June 12, 2016

Thanks For Stopping By!

Thanks for stopping by Melva Loves Scraps!  The title says it all... I love scraps! I am a Homemaker who loves to quilt, especially with a scrappy look.   I love the challenge of working with scraps, remnants and cast-offs to bring forth something beautiful.

This doesn't just apply to quilting, but with life in general!  I love to cook.  But given the fact that Dave & I are empty-nesters, this means that we have plenty of leftovers.  I love to accept the challenge of transforming leftovers into new meals.

I also have a love for scrapbooking and have a serious need to get caught up... I am three years behind!  This blog was originally started in 2011 when I participated in a weekly scrapbooking challenge.  I soon lost interest in the challenge and the blog went to the wayside until I submitted a block for volume 8 of Quiltmaker's 100 Blocks publication.  It was shortly after that I decided that this blog would be a great way to document and share the stories of my quilts and some of the thoughts and experiences of life as I create them.

I hope that you enjoy your visit and that you will choose to return on occasion because you just never know what I might be doing or what my latest project may be.  Some say I am crazy, some say talented… all I know is that life keeps me on my toes!   And I do my best to keep a positive attitude and a sense of humor… and my faith keeps me on my knees and looking up.

Remember, when life gives you scraps, make a quilt!

Some of my favorite quilts…


Desert Oasis...
was a quilt created during a very uncertain time of our lives.  My husband had faced some serious challenges with his job and the future of our financial security and employment were hanging in the balance.  At the same time my Dad was facing the last days of his life. You can read the entire story here.  This was a quilt that offered healing to me as I worked on it.  I enjoyed using it for a short time… I then passed it on to the brother-in-law of a former high school classmate who had suffered a serious stroke.  He has since passed away, but his wife continues to enjoy the quilt and draws comfort from it.


was probably the most intimidating quilt that I have made.  It consists of 1,092 pieces that are 1-inch finished squares.  It was a springboard type project - I recently did another one of a cross and I am currently in the midst of laying out and piecing another “photo” quilt... the face of Jesus. 


The Broken Star Quilt...
was one of the most difficult quilts I have done… It was a 30-year old kit with pre-cut pieces that were inconsistent in size.  You can read about this quilt and all of the headaches and problems I faced while piecing it here.

This Love of Log Cabins quilt was created while I was part of the Addicted to Scraps group  associated with Quiltmaker Magazine & Bonnie Hunter.  


The full story about how there were two misplaced blocks that were discovered after it had been completed and what I decided to do to fix it is hereI was working with a deadline and felt rushed... which is probably why the misplacement was overlooked...

Had I been a little more diligent in taking photos along the way I may have noticed the misplacement of the two blocks.  

It was about 17 years ago when I had started going to a block of the month group and one of the tips the teacher gave was to go to the hardware store and buy a peep hole and use it backwards… it reduces the quilt top so that you can have a better view of what the quilt top looks like from a distance.  Rather than use a peep hole, I now use my digital camera. I snap a photo and can quickly see if there is something out of place…  This is the technique I have used with the digitized Jesus photo.  



I could see that the shading around his nose & lips were quite right… So would change a few blocks and snap another photo and then change a few more... the changes toward the end were very subtle, but necessary.  Have you ever done a pieced "photo" quilt?  Any tips you are willing to share?

So, my tip for quilting... take lots of pictures.  My tip for blogging... take lots of pictures... Readers like pictures and to see the progress of a project.

This is something that I have emphasized to my husband, Dave, over the past three years.  As the "director of marketing" (just one of many other roles) for our business I am always looking for something to share on fb for his page Nolan Quality Customs.  I have been encouraging him to start his own blog... He has been in his trade (gunsmithing) for 30+ and he taught for 18+ years during that.  He has a wealth of knowledge that he can share in his trade. So there is another blogging tip - Just Do It!  At least start it and it will evolve into what it needs to be.  

Again, thanks for stopping by!

Blessings,

Melva               


See what other quilters are talking about at Quilter Blogs


46 comments:

  1. It was fun learning a bit more about you and your quilting. Love that rooster with all those little squares. Definitely a labor of love!

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  2. Oh the rooster is really cool! I just finished s pixel quilt myself, but cheated on the background and made it out of bigger pieces. Nice to "meet" you :)

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  3. Good morning. I enjoyed reading your story. Thanks for the tip to take pics....I hope someday it sticks in my head, because that applies to everything doesn't it!

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  4. Morning Melva! Lovely to read more about you and your quilting journey. I love your rooster quilt - wow! I love working with scraps too and 1" squares are just wonderful - although you do need lots of time! I'll be sure to check back to see how you are getting on with your current projects.

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  5. Melva, Wonderful getting to you know, and see some of your beautiful work in one place. This has been such a fun hop to get to know each and every quilter.

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  6. Good morning! Your quilts are stunning...especially the rooster...wow! Working with scraps is one of my favorite ways of quilting...so many prints and colors coming together in unity....just the way I pray the world will do someday. Grace and peace...Sharon

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    1. Thanks Sharon! Given the tragic shootings that took place in FL over the weekend I agree (even more), that the world needs to come together in unity, just like the prints & colors of quilts :)

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  7. I love all the Quilts especially the broken star and it was nice getting to know about you here and thanks for sharing your tips :)

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  8. Your Broken Star quilt may have been difficult and challenging, but is surely is the most beautiful quilt. The funny thing is 'Just Do It' is my mantra too, I just ned to remember to apply it to FMQ and I've cracked it.
    Smiles
    Kate

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    1. Thanks for stopping by! I agree that the broken star turned out stunning... it is interesting because I never would have picked the black as a background... I would have used the white, but I followed the customer's request. I am so glad that I did!

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  9. I definitely agree with your jump in and do it attitude about blogging! Thank you so much for helping us get the 2016 New Quilt Bloggers blog hop started this year; I am really excited it is officially started.

    I do not have any experience with photo quilts. I have to say that I am amazed at what can be done with them and really impressed with the patience that it takes to make quilts from 1" finished squares! I really agree that taking lots of photographs is a very good way to get a different perspective on a quilt, and the piecing mistakes that I make can almost all be traced back to being rushed or projects where I did not step back and "breathe" for a moment.

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    1. Thanks for being part of the coordinating team for the bloggers group! And thanks for stopping by. :)

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  10. Melva, it is great to read more about you. Your picture quilts are extremely cool. The rooster is absolutely beautiful. I also love the story behind your Desert Oasis quilt. It sounds like it has brought comfort to several who have been hurting and it is great that it still is today. I look forward to continuing to get to know you.

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  11. Hi Melva, it is fun to see all your beautiful quilts and to learn more about you. I have yet to make a log cabin quilt, but have always wanted to. Your's is gorgeous. Like your suggestions for taking lots of pictures.

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  12. Hi Melva, it is fun to see all your beautiful quilts and to learn more about you. I have yet to make a log cabin quilt, but have always wanted to. Your's is gorgeous. Like your suggestions for taking lots of pictures.

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  13. Hi Melva! I absolutely agree with you... take lots of photos. If you don't use it now you will need eventually. The story of your desert quilt is beautiful and how wonderful of you to share it with others to provide comfort. Your broken star quilt is stunning!!!

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  14. Hello Melva, you are a beautiful quilter with a wealth of experience. I love the log cabin and know the experience of seeing something not quite right after the fact. Sometimes that is the "humility" block that reminds us we are all human.

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    1. Had it not been to be included in a video tutorial for QM, I would have left it... We all need a reminder of how human we are. And a misplaced block is a simple tool for that. Thanks for stopping by. :)

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  15. Hi Melva! I've been blogging for nine years. And while many of the quilters I once followed (like 80 of them!) have now stopped blogging, I keep going. The reason is that at the end of each year I have all my blog posts turned into a print book. It's turned out to be a good way to document my life. Hopefully, one day when I'm gone, our five grandchildren will enjoy looking at the pictures and reading about my life. I love taking pictures too, and have w-a-y too many that need to be organized! How does one keep track of them all, especially when so many are process and finished pictures of quilts?!

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    1. What a brilliant idea to turn the posts into a book! I may need to borrow your idea. It is very convenient that with technology we have digital photos and instant access to the photos. Not like years ago when you had to finish a roll of film and wait for it to get developed... and then be disappointed if the pictures were not quite right. Blessings. :)

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  16. Hi Melva. I enjoyed reading more about you and seeing more of your beautiful quilts. Thank you for sharing. I am really loving the rooster quilt.

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  17. I too have scrapbooked and am about 3 years behind. However, quilting will always be my number one. I love your log cabin quilt!

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    1. Suzy, we should get together and catch up on our scrapbooks! Thanks for stopping by :)

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  18. I just love your Rooster quilt!! So amazing! :)

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  19. I like your attitude. Just do it! I'm also totally in love with your rooster quilt ! Thanks for the reminder to take lots of photos during construction I find it helps a lot too but I don't usually do it. You sound massively busy, I don't know how you keep up with everything!

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  20. You have got to have patience of a saint Beautiful work, I'm partial to Roosters. Thanks for sharing
    kfreddss@yahoo.com

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  21. Very lovely post, thank you for letting us get to know you better. Your pixelated quilts are so fantastic, how do you keep up your stamina to finish them?

    I have not ever attempted a pieced photo quilt but have ordered a pattern of my son from that one company (I totally forget the name) that will make up a pixelated pattern from a photo. All the little squares were really daunting.

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  22. Hi Melva. This has been a lovely post and your blog is looking very polished. I don't know how you keep track of all those squares in a pixelated quilt. Are you working from a coloured pattern? The rooster is something else!

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    1. I do work from colored photos. I discovered the Rooster quilt a while back on social media and saved the photo. It was an actual quilt so it was pretty easy, other than the size. I will be doing a post on the Jesus quilt that will include a photo of how I kept track of what row I was working on.

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  23. Hi Melva. This has been a lovely post and your blog is looking very polished. I don't know how you keep track of all those squares in a pixelated quilt. Are you working from a coloured pattern? The rooster is something else!

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  24. Hi, Melva! You do love scraps! And I love that rooster quilt. I am about ready to launch (in a day or so) a post about my postage stamp quilt. You might be interested. Nice job on the blog. Karen at Tu-Na Quilts, Travels, and Eats at https://tunaquilts.wordpress.com/

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    1. I will watch for it. Thanks for the heads up! Blessings.

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  25. Your rooster and broken star quilts are wonderful! I first looked at your blog on my mobile phone (lots more people are doing that these days) and some of your text is highlighted with a white background over your pinkish website background - when you get a chance, perhaps have a quick look at this post on a mobile? Still readable, just looked a little strange :)

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    1. Thanks for your suggestion. In the critiques this never was mentioned. I have a tablet and it appears fine. I will be sure to grab my husbands phone and check on there.

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  26. Hi Melva! I love your rooster quilt! I like your advice about pictures. Even when I'm sewing, I find that taking pictures of different layouts allows me to look at my projects differently. They tend to look different in photos than in person.

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  27. Hi, Melva! You rooster quilt is fantastic. I've done a pixel quilt /pieced photo quilt and it was a beast to do! I used the method where you lay all of your blocks on fusible interface, iron them down, and then sew the seams. If I ever make another pixel quilt I will NOT use that method again. It was awful for me.

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    1. Interesting method. It would not have worked for me as I was always moving and changing shades or colors!

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  28. That's great advice Melva! I often make myself start something difficult by telling myself to "Just Do It!" Your quilts are beautiful! Oh My, the patience it must take ti do all those little 1 inch squares.

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  29. Fantastic post, Melva! I love reading about your scrap addiction. I've got a pretty serious case of that myself! Your quilts are all very lovely and your rooster is so impressive, I'm feeling inspired to give one inch squares a try. πŸ˜€ I love your photo tips and agree with both! I've saved many quilts by looking at photos first. I'm also trying my hardest to adopt a Just Do It mentality - thanks for the reminder! Happy to have learned a little more about you. 😊

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    1. Thanks for stopping by. I chuckled as I read that you were inspired to give 1" squares a try. That was what I thought. Now after doing the rooster and Jesus I am happy with the end results, but... I am over it! Don't let me stop you... Go for it! I'd love to see what you come up with :)

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  30. Melva, your quilts are beautiful! I have no tip for photo quilts because I've never done one but I'm seriously tempted now after seeing your lovelies! I like your tip. Photos are so useful in the creative process and you're sure right about blogging! I love blogs with lots of photos. I keep forgetting though to take more photos while I'm making something. I think I get so into the project at hand that I just forget! Sigh.

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  31. Oh my goodness, Melva, that rooster is amazing!!!!!! I'm so glad you are drawn to that kind of project, because I am definitely not and I'm glad it exists in the world!

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  32. Nice post Melva - so nice to get to know you. I just love your Rooster quilt. Fantastic!

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  33. Great post! Your Love of Log Cabin quilt is really stunning. I'm going to head over to read about how you fixed it now, I just have to know! :)

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  34. Oh that rooster!! It was nice to get to know you a bit more, Melva.

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  35. I'm coming over for a visit very late from Yvonne's, definitely good tips all round, and I love your rooster.

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