Thursday, December 3, 2020

Pieces From The Past - The Corner Star



Today's letter is from Gotthart Hauswald... son of Mase Hasuwald, the Postal Inspector that wrote to Phillip & Katie with Block #14 (The Owl Block) inquiring of how his son's health and general mood were when he was held at Camp Trinidad.






Oberseifersdorf 
                                                15-11-1947
Dear Mister Schleich!

I don’t know if you can remember we worked on your farm in the sugar beets.

My name is Hauswald and I was an American prisoner in the camp of Trinidad.

It’s a long time, but I could not write you, because when I came back to Germany, the Russians, who occupy our country, took me as a prisoner again, and sent me to Russia, where I must work.  After a year I took ill and three months later I was sent back to my parents.

On the wrong-side of the picture we presented you during our work on your farm are some signatures.  Among these signatures is also my name in German letters – Gotthart Hauswald.

In Germany we have very small food.  We can buy food only for tickets.  There is 300 g. bread, 10 g. grease, 20 g. sugar, 20 g. meat a day.  20 zigaretts a month is all we can smoke.  Butter, cocoa, chocolade, milk, eggs and cheese and other agriculture products are unknown things.  It would be a paradise if we can get coffee, or cake, or honey.

A happy Christmas and a happy New Year 1948 for you and your family.

Yours affectionately,
Gotthart Hauswald
Many greetings for Mr. Eckard!

The harsh conditions that Mr. Hauswald endured as a prisoner of the Russian's must have been horrendous!  And the fact that he was forced to work until he fell ill and could no longer work is awful. I have a better understanding of his father's concern for him and realize that he is probably very lucky that he was released prior to his death. 

Notice that more than two years following the end of WWII the residents of Germany still received rations.  In the United States rations were eliminated by the end of 1945, with the exception of sugar, which continued until June of 1947.  The rations that Mr. Hauswald outlined were as follows...

300 g. bread = less than a pound; 
10 g. grease = only .35 ounce (about 1 tablespoon);
20 g. sugar = less than an ounce, .70 ounces to be exact;
20 g. meat a day - the same as the sugar... less than one ounce a day!
20 cigarettes a month.  

How interesting that cigarettes were available through rations.  Of course, they did not yet know or understand the extent of the health implications associated with them.

As I consider the impact that Phillip and Katie had on these men, these men equally impacted the lives of my Grandparents, my Dad, and his siblings.  I remember as a kid hearing about the POWs and how the men would sometimes fight each other to get to go to the Schleich farm... and how the men that DID get to go to the Schleich's might keep a "badge of honor" on their shirt collar, such as powdered sugar from one of Katie's home made doughnuts.  It just makes me smile.

The pride that Phillip and Katie felt by being able to help these men in a very small way while held as prisoners at Camp Trinidad - making them comfortable and offering a feeling of safety while on the farm - must have been met with feelings of great disappointment with each letter requesting help in knowing that they were simply unable to do so. 

The inscription on the back of the photo reads 
In memory of Gotthart Hauswald, German Prisoner of war.  
Germany 
Christmas 1947

When I read this inscription my heart sank in thinking that he must have died, but then I quickly realized that he himself had penned the letter.

But I wonder... did Gotthart, or any of the other men, recall the Christmas seasons that were celebrated while a prisoner at Camp Trinidad?  The following accounting of a Christmas celebration, as told by Karl-Horst Heil in his journal and published by Kurt Landsberger in his book, "Prisoners of War at Camp Trinidad" may have come to the mind of many of these men...

December 19 - 
"From the room next door we hear over the radio the song "Silent Night, Holy Night."  Nobody said a word and the song kept us in a somber mood, our thoughts were with the fatherland."

December 24 - 
"I just returned from the Christmas celebration for our company.  It was  short but touching.  After all the electric lights were turned off in our mess hall.  Small candles on wooden stars made in our workshop lighted the room.  After the candles were lit on our Christmas tree, comrades from different locales spoke, some did poetry.  Chamber music was played, the choir sang 'Holy Night'."

"In front of everyone were two small plates with Christmas cookies, nuts, apples and a small fruit cake.  After our company commanders spoke we sang Christmas songs.  Walking to our barracks we admired the Christmas tree near the gate, but it looks even better during the day with the Rocky Mountain peaks (Spanish Peaks) behind the tree."

December 25 - 
"Today breakfast was at 9:45 and lunch was at 13.00 - we ate turkey.  In the afternoon we visited each other;"

How many of these men, who thought being separated from their loved ones because of WWII was so very difficult, later longed for a return to Camp Trinidad for the simple comforts of life that we often, in our current time, take for granted...

A home with insulated walls and a roof over our heads as well as warmth offered by a furnace or fire place, a bed and pillow to lay our heads upon at the end of our days an the security of knowing there will be meals on our tables.

Many of us are turning our own thoughts to how different our holiday celebrations may look because of the corona virus this year... perhaps we won't be with our extended families, but that doesn't mean that we can't still celebrate and enjoy the season.  

My personal feelings of the increasingly over-commercialized season for the last few years has seen us scaling back a bit.  

We would rather spend an evening preparing and sharing a meal with friends than give a gift card to a restaurant for them to enjoy alone. 

We would rather take the grand-children to a book store to pick out a book together rather than than just give them one to open.  I look forward to when our grand-daughters are just a bit older and being able to take them to the American Girl Place, just as we did with our own daughters!

Well, that was a rabbit trail!  Back on track... The inspiration for the block that is partnered with this letter - The Corner Star Block - is from the journal - "
Small candles on wooden stars made in our workshop lighted the room."

Now, go download the free pattern and get busy with this block.  This block includes some simple piecing and a little bit of paper-piecing.  You can do it!  
As you piece, you will probably notice that the center 9-patch with the corners is larger than 8-1/2 inches.  This is not a problem...  Simply position your cutting ruler centered on the block and trim.  Notice in the picture of the block that the corner of the 9-patch is not a perfect point.  The points that matter the most are the outer star points.  

Another tip I would make note of is that you need to be certain that page 2 of the pattern (the FPP templates) is printed at 100% (hint:: they need to measure 8-1/2" long).  If you need a refresher on how to do the foundation paper piecing, you can find help on the post for block #5, Our Country.


After the completion of Block #12 (Pine Burr Block) I gave detailed cutting instructions for sashing strips.  

With the completion of your Corner Star block you can gather up these additional blocks -  #8 (Friendship Quilt), #2(Lost Goslin'), #11(Indian Star) - and assemble Row 5.

You will need three 2-1/2" x 12-1/2" strips.  Join the sashing strips between the blocks to complete the row.  Join Row 5 to the bottom of the sashing strip on Row 4.

But before you leave, tell me...

What are some of your favorite small gifts to make for family and friends?  

I'll be making some small quilted coasters/decorations for our friends... something that can easily be tucked in with our Christmas card/letter.  They will be based on the Corner Star Block.  Details on these items will be coming soon!   

Piece & Joy,

Melva

Melva Loves Scraps - Home of the Pieces From The Past Sew Along
that features vintage Kansas City Star quilt blocks!
Linking with:
Mid-week Makers at Quilt Fabrication
Wednesday Wait Loss at The Inquiring Quilter
Put Your Foot Down at For the Love of Geese
Needle & Thread Thursday at My Quilt Infatuation
Creative Compulsions at Bijou Bead Boutique
Can I Get A Whoop Whoop at Confessions of a Fabric Addict
Off The Wall Friday with Nina Marie
Brag About Your Beauties at From Bolt to Beauty
Peacock Party at Wendy’s Quilts and More
Friday Foto Fun at Powered by Quilting
Finished or Not Friday at Alycia Quilts

Tuesday, December 1, 2020

New To-Do

 As the calendar page turns, it seems that all thoughts turn toward Christmas.  I know that 2020 has been a different and challenging year for so many.  One comfort is knowing that despite all that has transpired, there is One that has been, is and always will be the same - My Lord and Savior - the center of the Christmas Season for so many.

My faith is what has sustained me throughout the year... and we are smack dab in the middle of Advent - a season of preparation.  Trees go up, decorations come out, manger scenes get unwrapped and gifts get wrapped up and sent off.

That is where I have been - the wrapping and packing stuff.  I recently listed items from my inventory for sale and have been pleasantly surprised at the interest.  

While searching for something else in my studio closet I came across some fabric that was perfect for another Ruana (link to a tutorial was in the November 17th post).  This Ruana was one of the "creative" projects I worked on last week.  I can successfully check that item off of last week's to-do list 😁

We had a wonderful day together on Thanksgiving... indeed giving thanks for the opportunity to be in one place.  Dolls were being played with, a game of Battleship was going on, enjoyable conversation took place and our Momma-to-be was napping on the floor in the midst of it all. 

After the big celebration our quiet life resumed and I returned to the studio in search of a project to get some creative juices going.

I had picked up this fabric at a second hand store for just $1 and it has been hanging around just waiting for the perfect project.  

On Saturday I participated in the Saturday Sew In hosted by Jennifer Fulton at Quilting with the Inquiring Quilter. 

I got a good start on two of them...




And then I remembered that I needed to get the story for the next Pieces From The Past block release.

I really do try to start early on Christmas gifts but there is always one or two that are held until December.  One is always for one of the nieces/nephews of Dave's family.

He is from a large family - he is #5 of 8 kids.  We gave up on the gift exchange for the adults and have all agreed that we can make a family contribution to an organization chosen by one of the siblings.  This is the 4th year of doing this so the 4th child, Dave's sister Sharon, got to pick the non-profit.  The family will be donating to The Kukhoma Project that offers outreach to very young girls in the Lusaka, Zambia area who are susceptible to abuse and the fallout of that.

The family has continued the gift exchange for the children.  And we have the joy of gifting to nephew Liam, a 3-1/2 year-old boy.  When I asked his Momma what he had on his wish list she replied back with "He was asking for some little hot wheels cars yesterday, so that would be great."  

That is super easy... but he needs more than just a few cars.  So I thought I might be able to purchase one of the playmat panels to quilt and he could use it with the hot-wheels.  I know that time is short but I thought I would check with a couple of my favorite "local quilt shops" that I have made on-line purchases from.  I had no luck so I turned to Joann's.  

❧ While I did not find a panel for purchase, I DID find a pattern to make my own!


This is perfect!!!  Now you know where you will find me for the next week.  I need to do a quick fabric search (possibly a quick run to the fabric department at Wallyworld) and I will be on my way!

 If time allows, I want to create some small quilted Christmas Ornaments that can be easily slipped in with our Christmas cards/letter.

❧ This reminds me... I need to get a start on our letter.  It is unique in that each of us (Dave, Heather, Rebecca and I) writes our own section.  This came about years ago when the girls were young teens and I was pressed for time.  I said I need help and this is what transpired. A newsletter format written to highlight each person's interests and activities.  I used to print it myself, but have discovered that the cost is about the same by having the local copy shop print it for me.  It saves me the time and frustration... and they even fold it for me!

I'll be signing off for now.  But be sure to come back on Thursday for the release of the Corner Star Block and another letter in the Pieces From The Past Sew Along series.

Piece and Joy,

Melva

 

Melva Loves Scraps - Home of the Pieces From The Past Sew Along
that features vintage Kansas City Star quilt blocks!

Linking with:
Monday Making at Love Laugh Quilt
Design Wall Monday at Small Quilts and Doll Quilts
To Do Tuesday at Home Sewn By Us

Tuesday, November 24, 2020

To Do... #1 Give Thanks

 Last week's list...



✔  Sew on a label - it still needs a name, but I will wait for the little guy to arrive for that. 






✔  Postcard blocks - As I had anticipated, I didn't get very far with this one while we were away... but I took the time to finish it yesterday as I recouped from our time away and a busy weekend.  

This little hummingbird still needs an eye embroidered, but I think he turned out pretty cute!

Our time away was fun, wild and crazy and boy do we have stories to tell!  lol.


In the Purgatoire River bed at the bottom of Picket Wire Canyon is a trail of dinosaur tracks.  This, in my mind, was the ultimate destination.  However, it was a good distance...


And the other sign that was at the trailhead was a bit daunting...



We descended on foot on the first afternoon... thinking confidently that we would be able to make it to the Mission.  Ummmm... didn't happen.  We did make it to an abandoned homestead.

And were able to scout out the path prior to our trek with the bikes.  The next day we were loaded up with lunches, snacks and lots of water.


The sign at the top of the trail suggested we be prepared for flats... We were!  Two spare tubes and a patch kit with six "scabs".  We'll be good...


I was concerned about my tires because the back tire is nearly bald from our trip down the mountain at Telluride last year (another crazy idea/adventure!)  We enjoyed the ride once we reached the bottom of the canyon, visited the homestead a bit more and then headed toward the Mission.  Sadly, the first flat came before we reached it.  


We used the pump and ride as far as you can method until we found some shade.  


We had made the pact at the on-set, "when one walks, we all walk".



We made the necessary swap out of a tube and we were on our way once again.  With a few more "distractions" before we reached the Mission site, we laughed and talked along the way.  It was a much needed time of socializing that we all needed.  


After taking in the scenery and inspecting some of the gravestones we were on the move again.



A few more "walking sessions" took place because the tires were leaking nearly as fast as they were getting filled, but at long last we arrived at the dinosaur tracks!









Since we were by the river, we took advantage of the water and found/repaired the punctured tubes so that we could make our way back out of the canyon... after all, remember, it was MANDATORY!

While we were there we ran into another hiker who told us about a "shortcut" back out.  We were up for it, but in the end, I'm not sure it was a shortcut.  While it may have cut off some distance, it was rigorous and rough!  The trail was a single track and it was impossible to keep the bike on the path AND walk in the path.  We were dodging cactus on the left and the right and at one point it became rocky, rough and narrow.  So much so that we had to carry our bikes through a section.  
It was rOuGh... but we made it to the rim of the canyon! Woohoo!


And then it happened... one more flat tire - this one on Dave's bike. 😭  We had no more patches and we had taken the bad tubes and lined the tires of the "problem" bike to reduce the occurrence of the flats.  We resumed the pump and ride fast and as far as you can.  We had sent our friends on ahead for the truck to pick us up.
Keith arrived with his "chariot" when we were just .7 miles from camp.  Dave refused to give in so close... He had stopped to pump for one last time and the pin that held the handle in place had fallen out.  *UGH*  We were so close.  As Dave pushed his bike to the back of the truck the missing pin was found... laying in the middle of the road!  We were back in business.

Oh. My. Gosh... We made it back on our own wheels! Wow!

After consuming copious amounts of water we celebrated with some happy hour beverages and watched the sun set again.  It was gorgeous!


So... never think that you are over prepared... and always give thanks!

As for my To-Do list for next week?  

#1 Give thanks and enjoy Thanksgiving Day with our little family on Thursday.

#2  Spend a little time in the studio doing something creative... I have no idea what, but, I will certainly find SOMEthing.

Be blessed and stay safe!


 
Melva


Melva Loves Scraps - Home of the Pieces From The Past Sew Along
that features vintage Kansas City Star quilt blocks!


Linking with:

Monday Making at Love Laugh Quilt
Design Wall Monday at Small Quilts and Doll Quilts
To Do Tuesday at Home Sewn By Us
Mid-week Makers at Quilt Fabrication
Wednesday Wait Loss at The Inquiring Quilter
Can I Get A Whoop Whoop at Confessions of a Fabric Addict
Off The Wall Friday with Nina Marie
Brag About Your Beauties at From Bolt to Beauty
Peacock Party at Wendy’s Quilts and More
Friday Foto Fun at Powered by Quilting
Finished or Not Friday at Alycia Quilts




Tuesday, November 17, 2020

Ta-Dah! Tuesday

 I set forth my list of To Do's and they all became Ta-Dah's!  I love a productive week...

I'll be wrapping up the table topper with our business logo


I love the way it looks! And the win-win is that when Dave wants to do photos of the the guns he builds or restores there is no need for watermarking the photos.



He did tell me that it is too nice to be left on the table between shoots so it will be protected from grease and oil stains.  

Just look at all that texture!  Though it seemed to take forever to do the acres of stippling, it was worth it. 

And the 80% cotton batting, after washing and drying it, adds to it!





 Releasing the next Pieces From The Past block - #15 - The Maple Leaf Block - a super simple pattern that is a very traditional and a family recipe for pinto beans that ties into the letter from former Prisoner of War, Erich Vogel. 

This is a hotpad that I made using the pattern...  I love the effect of the printed background and "disappearing" leaf.



 Starting a baby quilt for a special young lady we have known for about 20 years.  

Not only did I start it, I finished it.  The center panel featuring Tigger says "Let's Go Explore".  The quilt is a small one... perfect for a newborn baby and tummy time.

❧I'll be sewing on a label before sending it off... one of the projects I'll be taking with me as we run off for one final camping trip for the year.

We'll be headed to a canyon that has dinosaur tracks in it - The Picketwire Trail.  

❧I'll take along a few more postcard blocks to stitch, but honestly, I don't know how much time I will have for that since the trail to the bottom of the canyon is 5 miles one way.  I may be too tired when we get back to camp.  

No other great plans other than trying out a new No Guilt::Go Quilt recipe for Creamy Chicken tortilla Soup.  I'll be making a few adjustments to it so that is falls within my dietary restrictions, but that won't be hard.  Omit the corn and stir in dairy free cream cheese rather than sour cream.


With the holiday season looming just around the corner I decided to pull some pretty fabric out of storage and make some wraps to sell.  A tutorial to make them is available on Marie Bostwick's blog.   

As Marie said... "I saw a pretty ruana in a local boutique with a $129 price tag, then I had an epiphany…

Hey! I can make these myself!"

And make them I did... I had enough fabric for six... and I have sold five already (at a much more affordable price).  As my sister-in-law stated... this is perfect symphony attire - if they ever start up again.  

And two of my friends purchased some as Christmas gifts for family members.  

Thank you to everyone who supports a small business!

Are you making Christmas gifts?
What are you making???  I'd love to hear your ideas.

Stay calm and keep quilting,

Melva

Melva Loves Scraps - Home of the Pieces From The Past Sew Along
that features vintage Kansas City Star quilt blocks!
Linking with:
Colour & Inspiration at Clever Chameleon Quilting
To Do Tuesday at Home Sewn By Us
Mid-week Makers at Quilt Fabrication
Wednesday Wait Loss at The Inquiring Quilter
Put Your Foot Down at For the Love of Geese
Needle & Thread Thursday at My Quilt Infatuation
Creative Compulsions at Bijou Bead Boutique
Can I Get A Whoop Whoop at Confessions of a Fabric Addict
Off The Wall Friday with Nina Marie
Brag About Your Beauties at From Bolt to Beauty
Peacock Party at Wendy’s Quilts and More
Friday Foto Fun at Powered by Quilting
Finished or Not Friday at Alycia Quilts
Oh Scrap! at Quilting is More Fun Than Housework
Sunday Stash at QuiltPaintCreate
Patchwork & Quilts at The Quilting Patch
Scrap Happy Saturday at Super Scrappy
UFO Busting at Tish’s Wonderland

Thursday, November 12, 2020

Pieces From The Past - The Maple Leaf


Today's letter is from Erich Vogel and he had much to say!  His writing was quite small and he includes plenty of details.  If you close your eyes, you can almost feel as though you were there with him.



Glauchau, 11 August 1947

Very honored Mr. Schleich!

In the assumption that you will be interested to hear the fate of one of the POWs who worked for you. I want to give you, your family and acquaintances (Eckart) a small report from the old homeland.  At the time, I belonged to the Ruhr Group and I often think back fondly of the lovely days at your farm and at the Eckert farm.  How we took such care to separate the beets as cleanly as possible; grateful for the humane and kind treatment you gave us.  Today, in view of our difficulties, it all seems like it was a lovely dream.  

I am at my home in the Russian Zone.  My friend Wenzel, who was always ahead of everyone when hoeing the furrows, comes from Silesia, which is now part of Poland.  He works as a press worker in a factory in the English zone, separated from his wife who is still in the old homeland and who is waiting for her transport and deportation.  Our countrymen from Silesia, East Germany and Czechoslovakia have already in large part been deported from those areas and have been spread out across all of the zones.  

Because of the vast wreckage of the wartime bombing, there is a severe lack of housing, and many families must share their apartments with immigrants.  That causes a lot of anger, and a lot of squabbling and fighting.  Many of the evacuees have nothing more than what they can carry on their person.  All things are lacking.  Luckily, my wife and I and our three children have our small apartment to ourselves.  

With all that, it has not been going well for me.  For months I have suffered from open sores and dropsy.  Mostly it is a problem of obtaining food.  Above all, it is the lack of fat; but all other food supplies are also scarce.  Quite often as you walk the streets, you see people looking through trash piles and garbage cans for vegetables or similar things.  

The farmers receive, by law, a portion of grain, milk, eggs, potatoes, meat, fruit etc. in return for what they produce.   Naturally they prefer to sell their products for more money on the black market or to trade them for scarce products, such as shoes, socks, clothing, tools and other necessities.  But in our zone they are carefully supervised.  

The lack of coal or other heating supplies is also painful.  Last winter, trees from the center of the city were cut down and stolen.  Many are plagued by the fear of the coming winter.  

If you met your friends after your release from captivity (I was released from Russia at the beginning of March due to sickness), you had to ask: is it him or isn’t it?  Everyone is so thin and their pre-war clothes hang on them as if on the clothes hanger.  

This year, on several occasions, it happened that just after a farmer had brought in the grain from the field, bands of hungry people rushed in and stole away sheaves of grain.  Very often I have thought about the brown beans that in your area so plentiful.  Something so nourishing is barely available to us.  Unfortunately this summer is especially hot and dry, so there is not enough grass and clover for the cattle.  That badly affects the milk industry.  That and the fear that the potato harvest will go badly lies like a press on the people.  

The hospitals and doctors’ waiting rooms are overfull.  Most of the sick suffer from diseases caused by hunger.  Dropsy, weak heart, skin problems of all sorts.  And still, over two years after the war ended and things do not seem to be getting any better or not in the least bearable.  The gravediggers already have quite a lot to do; if the poverty does finally come to an end, then by then there will be a mass grave the size of which the world has never seen.  

Many of my friends from Camp Trinidad have lost their jobs and can earn just a minimum in the next best job.  Under such circumstances, I dream about those days that we spent on what I must call the blessed corner.  When we stopped work at noon, your dear wife would come out with the large cooking pots.  We from the old Ruhr Group greatly regretted that we were not more often assigned to work in the sugar beets fields at your farm and Mr. Eckart’s farm.  

After you, back then in June we were assigned to Mr. Baker and Mr. Hart, and also to Mr. Wenger.  For the harvest, we were with an Italian farm family, Marconi or some such name, the son-in-law was called Phillip, and last in the corn field of Mr. Meyer.  He did not feed us so well.  

Tell all of your acquaintances that the poverty in Germany is really terrible and that the least little thing would be a great help.  In the hope that things are going considerably better for you, I send best regards to you, your wife, your children, as well as to the Eckart family in grateful memory.  

Eric Vogel

Another heartbreaking letter, written 2+ years after leaving Camp Trinidad.  His mention of the brown beans that were so plentiful in the area - pinto beans -  captured my attention and drew me into my memories.

My Dad would make a crockpot of beans for various family get togethers... not the holiday meals, but every other time - like camping, picnics or "holiday" weekends and celebrations.

It always started with sorting the beans to make certain there were no "bad" beans that were shriveled or damaged.  But more importantly, the sorting was done to make certain there were no small rocks or clumps of dirt with them.

My cousin Glenda was one of the lucky grandkids who would be invited to spend a few days with Grandpa and Grandma (Phillip and Katie) and then later with Grandpa & Ottie (his second wife).  After she was married in the 1970s, she and her family would travel to visit Grandpa in Trinidad.  She learned first-hand from him how to make beans with ham... this is the "process" (because Grandpa didn't use recipes) that she shared with me.

Start with two cups of sorted and washed beans.  Place in a pressure cooker with a smoked ham hock or ham shank and just enough water to cover the beans.  Salt and pepper to taste and add a pinch of baking soda. (Grandpa told Glenda that the baking soda helped to reduce gas when you ate them. I'm not sure it worked... Haha!)

Place on stove and bring temperature up so that the "jiggler" begins to dance.  Cook for 30 minutes.  Remove from heat and carefully release the pressure.  Check the water level.  Add water, if needed, to just cover the beans again.  Seal the cooker and bring to a boil again until the "jiggler" dances and cook for 30 minutes.   

When I asked my Mom about how Dad made the beans it wasn't much different, but it was certainly "spiced up".  He would use the pressure cooker to begin the beans - cooking them for 30 minutes and then transfer to the crockpot to finish the cooking - often overnight or for a minimum of 8 hours.

My talented friend Kayleen created this little recipe card for me...



When I asked Mom why Dad's recipe was different from what Glenda had she explained that "until he was in his early 20s and started spending more time with his friends in town he had only known his Mom's or other family member's cooking" - pure German!  He is the one in the cowboy hat in the picture below. 💗


His friend Joe, who was an Italian, introduced him to Mexican food at a local restaurant and the rest was history.  His Mom's food was still good, but Dad definitely like spicy and flavorful!  In his retirement he enjoyed watching FoodNetwork and often wanted Mom to watch with him and try various recipes.  She wanted nothing to do with it. 🤷

Earlier in the letter, Mr. Vogel mentions his friend Wenzel, who was always ahead of everyone when hoeing the furrows.  This friend Wenzel was the author of a letter dated November 18, 1946 and published with the Dragonfly Block.  You may remember him because his post-script made mention of the request to make an alarm clock into a wrist watch.

Mr. Vogel wrote of his poor health with open sores and dropsy... I had to look it up.  Dropsy is edema, but I think he was really referring to famine dropsy which is occurs with the hypoproteinemia of low protein intake occurring as starvation of a large population group. 

Mr. Vogel's concern for the drought affecting the grass and clover for the cattle, and the milk supply and the effects on the potato harvest did nothing to help relieve his and his fellow citizen's anxiety.

His plea for "the least little thing" was undoubtedly a subtle request for one of the CARE packages also mentioned in the Dragonfly Block.  You may remember, the cost of the CARE packages was only $10.  That was a good chunk of change in those times, and with inflation that $10 converts to $131.48 in today's currency.  

The ability to draw on his personal memories of his time spent at the "blessed corner" is, no doubt, what kept him going.  Even though it was only August when he penned the letter, he was already concerned about the coming winter and the lack of coal and heating supplies.  His mention of trees being cut down at the center of the city the previous winter is reminiscent of Christian Fruehbuss's letter with the Pine Burr Block.  It is again the reason that I chose the Maple Leaf Block to accompany this letter.  This simple block will measure 9-1/2" square when pieced.


Now is the time to head over to payhip to grab the free pattern, pull your fabric and start piecing.  When you are done be sure to come back and link up for the chance to win a free fat-quarter.  If you would prefer to email your picture to me, I am happy to link you up.  Send me a message at MelvaLovesScraps@NolanQualityCustoms.com.  Don't forget to tag me on fb (MelvaLovesScraps) or instagram (@melvalovesscraps) and use the hashtag #piecesfromthepastsewalong so that everyone can see your beautiful fall leaves.



A few weeks ago I saw a maple leaf block done in reverse and called Falling Leaves... I just had to give it a try!  And now I have another (much needed) hotpad.

I, personally, am not a big fan of pinto beans, unless in chili... How about you?  Must have?  or Pass?

Was there something else in the letter that spurred a question or thought?

Leave a comment... you know I love when you stop by for a chat.  As one of my long-time readers stated... it is like having a visit with a friend.

Piece happy!

Melva


Linking with:
Colour & Inspiration at Clever Chameleon Quilting
Put Your Foot Down at For the Love of Geese
Needle & Thread Thursday at My Quilt Infatuation
Creative Compulsions at Bijou Bead Boutique
BOMs Away at What A Hoot Quilts
Can I Get A Whoop Whoop at Confessions of a Fabric Addict
Off The Wall Friday with Nina Marie
Brag About Your Beauties at From Bolt to Beauty
Peacock Party at Wendy’s Quilts and More
Friday Foto Fun at Powered by Quilting
Finished or Not Friday at Alycia Quilts
Oh Scrap! at Quilting is More Fun Than Housework
Sunday Stash at QuiltPaintCreate
Patchwork & Quilts at The Quilting Patch
Monday Making at Love Laugh Quilt
Design Wall Monday at Small Quilts and Doll Quilts
Scrap Happy Saturday at Super Scrappy